January 18, 2018

New study shows strong interaction between genetics and nutritional supplement treatment on progression to neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) Read the published article.

 

In a study published on January 8, 2018 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Demetrios G. Vavvas, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School and Incumbent of the Monte J. Wallace Ophthalmology Chair in Retina at Mass. Eye and Ear, as well as investigators from University of Toronto and Stanford University, addressed a controversial topic in the field of ophthalmology – whether treatment with the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation, a combination of high-dose antioxidants and zinc, is helpful or harmful to patients based on their underlying genetics. AREDS supplementation has been widely recommended for patients with intermediate AMD since 2001.

The researchers analyzed data from 802 patients (299 of those not analyzed in prior publications) who had been treated with either the AREDS formulation or a placebo in the original 2001 study. Their analyses showed that variations in CFH and ARMS2, two genes known to influence the progression to advanced AMD, powerfully affect an individual’s response to the AREDS formulation. Approximately 40% of patients in the study had a 50% reduction in risk of progression from intermediate to advanced AMD, which was double the benefit shown in the 2001 AREDS publication. However, 15% of patients with a specific combination of genetic risk variants nearly tripled their risk of developing neovascular AMD when treated with the AREDS formulation instead of a placebo.

Similar to the original AREDS study, the investigators in this study found that AREDS formulation treatment influences disease progression only in the neovascular form of AMD, commonly referred to as wet AMD. There was no significant treatment impact on progression to geographic atrophy, the advanced dry form of AMD.

“The results of our study show that an individual’s response to the AREDS formulation is influenced by that person’s genetic makeup, and underscores the importance of using genetic testing, whenever possible, to help guide the management of patients with AMD,” said Dr. Vavvas, adding “by utilizing genetics and personalized medicine to develop more precise diagnostics and treatments, we aim to improve the overall outcomes for our patients.”

Learn more and read the full abstract here.


SAN FRANCISCO, CA - Thursday, September 29, 2016 - Medscape Medical News/ASRS 2016 Annual Meeting

Genes May Shape Supplements' Effect on Macular Degeneration

 

Read more...

 

TORONTO, ON - August 9, 2016 - Arctic Dx

NEW Data concludes: AREDS Efficacy Differs by Genotype

 

 

SARASOTA, Fla. (PRWEB)

Macular Degeneration Association Issues Urgent Supplement Warning for Patients

 

Genetic Swab Test Can Help Doctors Determine if AREDS Supplements Helpful or Harmful

The Macular Degeneration Association, a nonprofit dedicated to preventing blindness, today issued an urgent warning to patients suffering from a form of the disease known as “intermediate dry age-related macular degeneration.” MDA leaders and ophthalmologists are advising patients to talk with their doctors about a proven and commonly prescribed vitamin supplement containing zinc, an ingredient that might actually be harmful in some cases. They are recommending a simple, personalized genetic test that could potentially indicate the difference between slowing or accelerating the progression of vision loss.  More...

 

 

Macular Degeneration Association  I  February 17 2016  I  Lake Sarasota 

EYE ASSOCIATION ISSUES URGENT SUPPLEMENT WARNING - Genetic Swab Test Can Help Doctors Determine if Helpful or Harmful

Sarasota Florida, February 17, 2016: —The Macular Degeneration Association, a nonprofit dedicated to preventing blindness, today issued an urgent warning to patients suffering from a form of the disease known as “intermediate dry age-related macular degeneration.” MDA leaders and ophthalmologists are advising patients to talk with their doctors about a proven and commonly prescribed vitamin supplement containing zinc, an ingredient that might actually be harmful in some cases. They are recommending a simple, personalized genetic test that could potentially indicate the difference between slowing or accelerating the progression of vision loss.  More...

 

Macular Degeneration Association  I  January 27 2016  I  Lake Sarasota

EYE VITAMINS – HELPFUL OR HARMFUL? The answer is in your GENES

Sarasota Florida: Patients with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) may be preserving or paradoxically losing their vision due to a fixed formulation of high-dose eye vitamins and zinc known as the AREDS Formulation. This public health issue is of concern for patients diagnosed with Intermediate Dry AMD. Patients should ask their doctor if AREDS is safe and effective for their use and they should consider genetic testing to determine the safety and efficacy of their eye vitamin preparation. More...

 

 

 

 

     

 

InfoClip.ca  I  Thursday, January 7 2016 | 7 h 55 min | News, Science

AREDS Controversy Goes Public

While the AREDS vitamin-zinc formulation and genetic testing dispute plays out in academic journals and on podiums of various ophthalmological meetings, a recent lay press article may bring new questions from AMD patients to your office. “Primary eye care practitioners need to become more aware of the evolving science,” says OD, Dennis Ruskin, past chair of the Ocular Nutrition special interest group within the American Academy of Optometry. See more...